Read The Passage And Now Once Again I Bid My Hideous Progeny Go Forth And Prospe

Read the passage.

And now, once again, I bid my hideous progeny go forth and prosper. I have an affection for it, for it was the offspring of happy days, when death and grief were but words, which found no true echo in my heart. Its several pages speak of many a walk, many a drive, and many a conversation, when I was not alone; and my companion was one who, in this world, I shall never see more.

According to the introduction to Frankenstein by Mary Shelley, what are her feelings toward her novel Frankenstein?

A) She was overwhelmed by writing it and is glad she is finished.

B) She is detached from the present reality of its success.

C) She has fond memories of the days when she was writing it.

D) She wishes she could go back and rewrite it differently.