Discussion Data Analysis Processes Once you finish reading

Discussion: Data Analysis Processes Once you finish reading all the transcripts for qualitative interviews, it is understandable that you may feel overwhelmed. Phenomenological interviews will often yield significantly more data than the case study interview; however, now you will start to make sense of all that data you collected. Unfortunately, novice researchers usually get to this stage with two main issues: first they think everything is important, and second, they will be afraid to choose any one thing on which to focus. The best way to navigate these two dilemmas is to remember that your interpretation of the data will be only one of several “right” ways in which the data can be interpreted. To prepare for this Discussion, review Section 2.14, “Data Analysis (Qualitative Only)” of the DBA Doctoral Study Rubric and Handbook and consider what data analysis process (modified Van Kaam, Van Maanen, thematic analysis, etc.) is most applicable to the research design described in your DBA Prospectus created in a previous course. By Day 3 Post an explanation for your choice of data analysis technique for doctoral qualitative research. In your explanation, do the following: Briefly describe the business problem identified for your DBA Doctoral Prospectus.Explain which data analysis process is most appropriate to your DBA Doctoral Study, providing a rationale for your choice using supportive scholarly examples. The specific business problem is that some small business owners lack the most suitable strategies needed in the process of enhancing employee retention. Be sure to support your work with a minimum of two specific citations from this week’s Learning Resources and one or more additional scholarly sources. Refer to the Week 5 Discussion Rubric for specific grading elements and criteria. Your Instructor will use this rubric to assess your work. Read a selection of your colleagues’ postings. (2.14) Data Analysis (Qualitative Studies Only) a. Identifies the appropriate data analysis process for the research design (e.g., one of the four types of triangulation for case study; modified van Kaam, van Maanen, etc. for phenomenology). b. Provides a logical and sequential process for the data analysis. c. Details the student’s conceptual plan or software (e.g., NVivo, Atlasti, Ethnograph, Excel, etc.) for coding, mind-mapping, and identifying themes. d. Identifies how the student will focus on the key themes, correlate the key themes with the literature (including new studies published since writing the proposal) and the conceptual framework. e. It is recommended to support claims and decisions with multiple scholarly peer-reviewed or seminal sources (as appropriate). Saunders, M. N. K., Lewis, P., & Thornhill, A. (2015). Research methods for business students (7th ed.). Essex, England: Pearson Education Unlimited. Yin, R. K. (2014). Case study research: Design and methods (5th ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage

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